Web accessibility for beginners

accessibility

#1

What are some good resources for getting started with building accessible websites.


I'm so happy we're here!
#2

These are the resources I’ve bookmarked on accessibility that have been referred to in the Chicago Tech Diversity Initiative Slack since it’s inception.


#3

I recently stumbled upon this accessibility patterns site when I was building a pagination control. It answered every question I had right in one place. It’s earned a spot among the few web sites I will visit (on any topic) before searching on Google.


#4

this is a good beginner’s overview of accessibility:

this isn’t a resource for learning about accessibility itself, but the aXe extension for chrome is an awesome tool for building accessible websites or learning about accessibility on websites you currently use–it analyzes web pages, flags violations, and offers potential solutions.


#5

I’m really enjoying Laura Kalbag’s book, ACCESSIBILITY FOR EVERYONE

https://abookapart.com/products/accessibility-for-everyone.


#6

All great links so far. A couple more I frequent:


#7

I’ve always been impressed by https://abookapart.com/


#8

I absolutely love all of the links already posted, and just wanted to chime in with a few of my other favorites.

  • Hands down, the a11ycasts series on YouTube by Rob Dodson is one that I recommend to anyone. Short, easily digestible videos and each one gave me so many “ah-ha!” moments.

  • Marcy Sutton’s free video course on Egghead.

  • Not free, but Heydon Pickering’s book Inclusive Design Patterns (I can only post two links, sorry!). It’s definitely not a one-and-done book, and serves as a great reference for whenever I am struggling with how to approach something from the ground up.


#9

The posters on this link give a quick overview of accessibility considerations for a variety of conditions. I’ve found they’re a good jumping off point for more detailed topics.


#10

At a presentation I gave last week on using WAI-ARIA (“WAI-ARIA in practice”, focused on publishing but almost entirely applicable to all web front ends), I provided a reading list of my favorite resources.

I’m a new user so I can’t put all the links natively here, but here’s the reading list of eight WAI-ARIA resources and four general accessibility resources. (@tylergaw already pointed to Léonie Watson, who is awesome.)

Don’t assume that random people speaking authoritatively about accessibility online knows what they are talking about! This, obviously, includes me and all of the respondents here. There is a lot of very outdated advice out there, and if you find someone insisting you use strong and em, or adding as much ARIA as possible, that’s a big red flag.

Also, remember that accessibility online doesn’t mean “screen reader user”, which is a common error people make.


#11

I also came to reply to this post specifically to recommend Laura Kalbag’s book, Accessibility for Everyone. It is really well and accessibly written and covers pretty much everything.